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CHERRIES

(Canned Fruits) - (The International Jewish Cook Book)







Prepare in the same manner as you would for preserving, allowing half a
pound of sugar to a pound of fruit. After putting the cherries into the
syrup do not let them boil more than five minutes; then fill your cans
to overflowing, seal immediately and then screw tighter as they grow
cold. Remove the little bag of stones which you have boiled with the
syrup. The object in boiling the stones with the syrup is to impart the
fine flavor to the fruit which cherries are robbed of in pitting.

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BRANDIED CHERRIES.

Put into a large wide mouthed bottle very ripe black cherries, add to
them two pounds of loaf sugar, a quart of brandy, and a few cloves,
then bruise a few more cherries, and simmer with sugar, strain and add
the juice to the cherries in the bottle, cork closely, and keep in a
warm dry place.

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CHERRIES FOR PIES

Stem the cherries--do not pit them,--pack tight in glass fruit jars,
cover with syrup, made of two tablespoons of sugar to a quart of fruit,
allowing one-half cup of water to each quart of cherries. Let them boil
fifteen minutes from the time they begin to boil.

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PRESERVED CHERRIES

The sour red cherries, or "Morellas," are the best for preserves. Never
use sweet ones for this purpose. Stone them, preserving every drop of
juice, then weigh the cherries, and for every pound take three-quarters
of a pound of sugar. Set the sugar and juice of the cherries on to boil,
also a handful of the cherry stones pounded and tied in a thin muslin
bag. Let this boil about fifteen minutes. Skim off the scum that rises.
Now put in the cherries, and boil until the syrup begins to thicken like
jelly. Remove from the fire, fill in pint jars, and when cold, cover
with brandied paper and screw on the cover tight.

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SPICED OR PICKLED CHERRIES

Take the largest and freshest red cherries you can get, and pack them in
glass fruit jars, stems and all. Put little splints of wood across the
tops of the fruit to prevent rising to the top. To every quart of
cherries allow a cup of best pickling vinegar, and to every three quarts
of fruit one pound of sugar and three sticks of whole cinnamon bark and
one-half ounce of cloves; this quantity of spices is for all of the
fruit. Boil the vinegar and spices and sugar for five minutes steady;
turn out into a covered stoneware vessel, cover, and let it get cold.
Then pour over the fruit and repeat this process three days in
succession. Remove the heads of the cloves, for they will turn the fruit
black. You may strain the vinegar after the first boiling, so as to take
out the spices, if you choose. Seal as you would other fruit. Be sure
that the syrup is cold before you pour it over the cherries.

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BRANDIED CHERRIES

Select the largest sweet cherries for this purpose, leaving the stems
on. Allow half a pound of sugar to every pound of fruit, and a pint of
good brandy for every five pounds of fruit. Make a syrup of the sugar,
using as little water as possible. Pour it over the cherries and let
them remain in the syrup all night. Next day put them in a preserving
kettle and heat slowly. Boil about eight minutes. Take up the cherries
with a perforated skimmer and boil the syrup fifteen minutes. Add the
brandy to the boiling syrup, remove from the fire and pour over the
cherries hot, and seal.

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PRESERVED "YELLOW GROUND CHERRIES"

Remove the gossamer-like covering from small yellow "ground cherries"
and place on range in a stew-pan with sugar. (Three-fourths of a pound
of sugar to one pound of fruit.) Cook slowly about 20 minutes, until
the fruit looks clear and syrup is thick as honey. Seal in pint jars.
These cherries, which grow abundantly in many town and country gardens
without being cultivated, make a delicious preserve and a very
appetizing pie may be made from them also.
Aunt Sarah said she preferred these preserved cherries to
strawberries.
Frau Schmidt preferred the larger "purple" ground cherries, which,
when preserved, greatly resembled "Guava" jelly in flavor.

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CANNED SOUR CHERRIES FOR PIES

Pit cherries and cover with cold water and let stand over night. Drain
in the morning. To 6 heaping cups of pitted cherries take 2 level cups
of sugar, 1/2 cup water. Put all together into stew-pan on range, cook
a short time, then add 1 teaspoonful of corn starch mixed with a
little cold water and stir well through the cherries; let come to a
boil, put in jars and seal. This quantity fills five pint jars. This
is the way one country housekeeper taught Mary to can common _sour_
cherries for pies and she thought them fine.

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PRESERVED CHERRIES

Aunt Sarah's preserved cherries were fine, and this was her way of
preparing them: She used 1 pound of granulated sugar to 1 quart of
pitted cherries. She placed the pitted cherries on a large platter and
sprinkled the sugar over them. She allowed them to stand several hours
until the cherries and sugar formed a syrup on platter. She then put
cherries, sugar and juice all together in a preserving kettle, set on
range, and cooked 10 minutes. She then skimmed out the cherries and
boiled the syrup 10 minutes longer, then returned the cherries to
syrup. Let come to a boil. She then removed the kettle from the fire,
spread all on a platter and let it stand in the hot sun two successive
days, then put in glass air-tight jars or in tumblers and covered with
paraffin. A combination of cherries and strawberries preserved
together is fine, and, strange to say, the flavor of strawberries
predominates.
A fine flavored preserve is also made from a combination of cherries
and pineapple.

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FROZEN CHERRIES.

Stone one quart of acid cherries; mix them with two pounds of sugar,
and stand aside one hour; stir thoroughly; add a quart of ice water;
put in the freezer, and stir rapidly until frozen; heat smooth; set
aside half an hour, and serve. That is the way to make frozen
cherries.

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MADELINE CHERRIES

Take some of the best French preserved prunes, and remove the stones.
Soak them in orange curaçoa for as long a time as you have at your
disposal. Then replace each stone by a blanched almond, and place the
prunes in small crystal dishes.
[_Pour la Patrie._]









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