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CUSTARD PUDDING

(General Remarks.) - (The Jewish Manual)







To one desert spoonful of flour, add one pint of fresh milk and the
yolks of five eggs; flavor according to fancy, with sugar, nutmeg, or
lemon-peel; beat to a froth two whites of eggs and pour to the rest;
boil rather more than half an hour.

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Custard Pudding

Stir a quart of milk very gradually into half a pint of flour--mix it

free from lumps, and put to it seven eggs, beaten with three

table-spoonsful of sugar, a tea-spoonful of salt, and half of a grated

nutmeg. Bake it three-quarters of an hour.

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Custard Pudding No 1

Take three quarters of a pint of milk, three tea-spoonfuls of flour, and

three eggs: mix the flour quite smooth with a little of the milk cold;

boil the rest, and pour it to the mixed flour, stirring it well

together. Then well beat the eggs, and pour the milk and flour hot to

them. Butter a basin, pour in the pudding. Tie it close in a cloth, and

boil it half an hour. It may be made smaller or larger, by allowing one

egg to one tea-spoonful of flour and a quarter of a pint of milk, and

proportionately shortening the time of boiling. It may be prepared for

boiling any time, or immediately before it is put into the saucepan, as

maybe most convenient. The basin must be quite filled, or the water will

get in.

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Custard Pudding No 2

Set on the fire a pint of milk, sweetened to your taste, with a little

cinnamon, a few cloves, and grated lemon-peel. Boil it up, and pour it

the moment it is taken off the fire upon the yolks of seven eggs and the

whites of four, stirring it well, and pouring it in by degrees. Boil it

in a well buttered basin, which will hold a pint and a half. Pour wine

sauce over it.

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Custard Pudding No 3

Boil a pint of milk and a quarter of a pint of good cream; thicken with

flour and water perfectly smooth; break in the yolks of five eggs,

sweetened with powdered loaf sugar, the peel of a lemon grated, and half

a glass of brandy. Line the dish with good puff paste, and bake for half

an hour.

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Custard Pudding No 4

Take six eggs, one table-spoonful of flour, and a sufficient quantity of

milk to fill the pan. Boil it three quarters of an hour.

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Custard Pudding

We give this pudding first because it affords an opportunity for giving

hints on making milk puddings generally, and because, properly made,

there is no more delicious pudding than this. It is besides most useful

and nutritious, not only for the dinner of healthy people, but for

children and invalids. But few cooks, however, make it properly; as a

rule too many eggs are used, to which the milk is added cold, and the

pudding is baked in a quick oven. The consequence is that the pudding

curdles and comes to table swimming in whey; or, even if this does not

happen, the custard is full of holes and is tough.



In the first place, milk for all puddings with eggs should be poured on

to the eggs boiling hot; in the next, the baking must be very slowly

done, if possible, as directed in the recipe; the dish containing the

pudding to be placed in another half-full of water. This, of course,

prevents the baking proceeding too rapidly, and also prevents the

pudding acquiring a sort of burned greasy flavour, which is injurious

for invalids. Lastly, too many eggs should not be used; the quantity

given, two to the pint of milk, is in all cases quite sufficient, and

will make a fine rich custard.



We never knew a pudding curdle, even with London milk a day old, if all

these directions were observed; but it is almost needless to say, that

the pudding made with new rich milk is much finer than one of inferior

milk.



Boil a pint and a half of milk with two ounces of lump sugar, or rather

more if a sweet pudding is liked, and pour it boiling hot on three eggs

lightly beaten--that is, just sufficiently so to mix whites and yolks.

Flavour the custard with nutmeg, grated lemon-peel, or anything which

may be preferred and pour it into a tart-dish. Place this dish in

another three-parts full of boiling water, and bake slowly for forty

minutes, or until the custard is firm. There is no need to butter the

dish if the pudding is baked as directed.









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