VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.homemadecookies.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
Home Recipes Cook Books Food Categories Featured

PEACHES

(Fresh Fruits And Compote) - (The International Jewish Cook Book)







Peel fine, ripe freestone peaches. Cover plentifully with pulverized
sugar, and serve with whipped cream. The cream should be ice cold.
Peaches should not be sliced until just before dining, or they will be
very apt to change color.

Other Recipes


SWEET ENTRÉE OF RIPE PEACHES

Take large, solid peaches, pour boiling water over them so that the skin
may be removed smoothly. Have ready thick syrup made of sugar and water.
When boiling hot add peaches and boil about five minutes; remove and
place in ice chest. When ready to serve have a sweet cracker on dish,
place peach on same and pour over this a raspberry jelly slightly
thinned and cover all with salted almonds or walnuts. Other fruits may
be treated in like manner.

Other Recipes


SCALLOPED PEACHES

Pare a number of peaches and put them whole into a baking-tin, together
with layers of bread crumbs and sugar and add a few cloves. Bake until
the top is brown. Serve with hot butter sauce or cream.

Other Recipes


FARINA PUDDING WITH PEACHES

To one quart of milk add one-half cup of farina, salt, and a small piece
of butter. Boil in a double boiler until thick. Beat the yolks of four
eggs with four tablespoons of white sugar, and add this just before
taking off the fire. Stir it thoroughly, but do not let it boil any
more. Flavor with vanilla. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth
with pulverized sugar. After the eggs have been whipped, butter a
pudding dish, put in part of the custard, in which you have mixed the
whites (If you have any extra whites of eggs beat and use them also),
then a layer of stewed or canned peaches; cover with the remaining
custard and bake. Eat with rum sauce.

Other Recipes


CANNED PEACHES

Wash peaches, put them in a square of cheese-cloth or wire basket. Dip
for two minutes in kettle of boiling water. Plunge immediately into cold
water. Skin the peaches; leave whole or cut as preferred. Pack peaches
in hot jars. Fill hot jars with hot syrup or boiling water. Put tops in
position. Tighten tops but not airtight. Place jars on false bottom in
wash-boiler. Let the water boil sixteen minutes. Seal as directed. To
eight quarts of peaches take three quarts of sugar, two quarts of water.
Apricots, plums and ripe pears may be treated exactly as peaches.

Other Recipes


CANNED PEACHES

To eight quarts of peaches take one quart of sugar and three quarts of
water. Make a syrup of the sugar and water; bring to a boil; skim it and
draw the kettle aside where the syrup will keep hot but not boil. Pare
the peaches, cutting them in halves or not as desired; if in half leave
one or two whole peaches for every jar, as the kernel improves the
flavor. Put a layer of fruit in the kettle; when it begins to boil skim
carefully; boil gently, for ten minutes; put in jars and seal. Then cook
more of the fruit in similar fashion. If the fruit is not ripe it will
require a longer time to cook.
All fruit may be canned in this manner, if desired.

Other Recipes


PRESERVED PEACHES

Weigh one pound of sugar for each pound of fruit. After weighing them
brush each peach with a stiff whiskbroom. This should be done in putting
up peaches in any way. After brushing them peel the peaches very thin
with a sharp silver knife. Do not use a knife with a steel blade, as it
discolors the fruit. As fast as the peaches are peeled lay them on
porcelain platters. Put the peelings in the preserving kettle with
enough water to keep from sticking. Stand the kettle over rather a quick
fire and let the peelings boil with the kettle covered until very soft.
Then drain them through a colander and pour the juice strained back into
the kettle. Add sugar to this and let it simmer gently until it is a
thick syrup. During the time the syrup is cooking it must be frequently
stirred and skimmed. As soon as the syrup is thick enough, drop in the
peaches, twelve at a time if for quart jars, and six at a time if for
pint jars. Let the peaches cook gently until each one may easily be
pierced with a broom splint.
Then quickly skim them out and lay them on a platter to cool. Repeat
this process until all the peaches are done, then let the syrup cook
until thick as molasses. Skim it thoroughly. When cool put the peaches,
one at a time, in the jars with a spoon. When the syrup is sufficiently
thick, pour it through a strainer over the peaches in the jars until
they are full, then seal down quickly and stand them upside down for
several hours before putting them in the store-room.

Other Recipes


PICKLED PEACHES

Brush but do not peel the peaches. Select medium-sized ones. When all
are well brushed, stick each peach quite full of cloves.
Make a thick syrup of half a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit. Cook
the peaches in the syrup until they may be easily pierced with a broom
splint. Then carefully skim them from the syrup and after they have
cooled on the platters put them in glass jars or stone crocks. To the
syrup in the kettle add a few pieces of stick cinnamon and a few whole
allspice. Add half a pint of good cider vinegar and a tablespoon of
tarragon vinegar to each quart of syrup, and when the syrup just comes
to a boil after adding the vinegar pour it over the peaches. Delicious
with cold chicken.

Other Recipes


BRANDIED PEACHES

Select only the largest and finest quality of clingstone peaches. Allow
a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit, and a pint of the best brandy to
every four pounds of peaches. Make a syrup of the sugar with enough
water to just dissolve it, and boil about half a dozen blanched peach
kernels with it. When the syrup boils put in the fruit and let it boil
about five minutes. Remove the fruit carefully upon platters, and let
the syrup boil fifteen or twenty minutes longer, skimming it well. Put
the peaches in wide-mouthed glass jars. If the syrup has thickened pour
in the brandy. Remove from the fire at once, pour over the fruit and
seal.

Other Recipes


PICKLED PEACHES

Twelve pounds of peaches, 1 quart of vinegar, 3 pounds brown sugar.
Rub the fuzz from the peaches. Do not pare them. Stick half a dozen
whole cloves in each peach. Add spices to taste, stick-cinnamon, whole
doves and mace. Put spices in a small cheese cloth bag and do not
remove the bag, containing spices, when putting away the peaches.
Scald sugar, vinegar and spices together and pour over the peaches.
Cover closely and stand away. Do this twice, one day between. The
third time place all together in a preserving kettle. Cook a few
minutes, then place fruit in jars, about three-quarters filled. Boil
down the syrup until about one-quarter has boiled away, pour over the
peaches, hot, and seal in air-tight jars. This is an old and very good
recipe used by "Aunt Sarah" many years.

Other Recipes


CANNED PEACHES

When canning peaches make a syrup composed of 1 cup of sugar to 2 cups
of water.
Place in preserving kettle and when sugar has dissolved cook thinly
pared peaches, either sliced or cut in halves, in the hot syrup until
clear, watching closely that they do not cook too soft. Place
carefully in glass jars, pour hot syrup over and seal in jars.
Aunt Sarah also, occasionally, used a wash-boiler in which to can
fruit. She placed in it a rack made of small wooden strips to prevent
the jars resting on the bottom of the boiler; filled the jars with
uncooked fruit or vegetables, poured over the jars of fruit hot syrup
and over the vegetables poured water, placed the jars, uncovered, in
the boiler; water should cover about half the height of jars. Boil
until contents of jars are cooked, add boiling syrup to fill fruit
jars and screw the tops on tightly.









Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK



Vote

1 2 3 4 5


Viewed 1790 times.

Home Made Cookies.ca