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POUND CAKE

(Cakes) - (The International Jewish Cook Book)







Rub one pound of butter and one pound of powdered sugar to a cream, add
the grated peel of a lemon, a glass of brandy and the yolks of nine
eggs, added one at a time, and last one pound and a quarter of sifted
flour with one-half teaspoon of baking-powder and the beaten whites of
the eggs. Bake slowly.

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A POUND CAKE.

Beat to cream a pound of butter and a pound of sifted loaf sugar; add
eight beaten eggs, stir in lightly three quarters of a pound of flour,
beat well together, and bake for one hour in a brisk oven; currants
may be added if, approved.

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Pound cake, one hour.

Fruit cake, three and four hours, depending upon size.
Cookies, from ten to fifteen minutes. Watch carefully.

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"FARMERS' POUND CAKE" (AS AUNT SARAH CALLED THIS)

Place in a bowl 2 cups of light, well-raised bread sponge (when all
flour necessary had been added and loaves were shaped ready to be
placed in bread pan for final rising). Cream together 3/4 cup of a
mixture of lard and butter, add 2 eggs, first yolks then stiffly
beaten whites, also add 1-1/2 cups soft A sugar. Add to the 2 cups of
bread sponge in bowl and beat well until fully incorporated with the
dough, then add 1/2 cup of lukewarm milk, in which had been dissolved
1/2 teaspoonful of salaratus.
Beat all together until mixture is smooth and creamy, then add 2 cups
of bread flour and 1/2 teaspoon of lemon flavoring. Beat well and add
1-1/2 cups of either currants or raisins, dusted with flour. Pour
mixture into an agate pudding dish (one holding 3 quarts, about 2-1/2
inches in depth and 30 inches in circumference). Stand in a warm place
3 to 4 hours to raise; when raised to top of pan place in a moderately
hot oven and bake about 40 minutes, when, taken from oven, dust with
pulverized sugar thickly over top of cake.
This cake should be large as an old-fashioned fruit cake, will keep
moist some time in a tin cake box, but is best when freshly baked.

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AN OLD RECIPE FOR POUND CAKE

Cream together 3/4 pound butter and 1 pound sugar and yolks of 10
eggs. Then add 10 whites of eggs well beaten alternately with 1 pound
of sifted flour.
Bake in a moderate oven with a steady heat. The bottom of pan should
be lined with well-greased paper.

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POUND CAKE. MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

One pound of butter, one pound of sugar, one pound of flour (sifted),
ten eggs (beaten separately), one-half teacup of rose water, one
nutmeg (grated), one pound of citron. Wash the citron; chop it fine.
Beat the butter and sugar to a cream; add the rose water and nutmeg,
then the yolks of eggs, and part of the flour; then the whites of eggs
and remainder of the flour; lastly, the fruit, lightly floured. Bake
in a moderate oven about two or two and one-half hours. Line the pan
with white paper.

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POUND CAKE

Whites of 8 eggs
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
3/4 cup granulated sugar
3/4 cup flour
1 teaspoon Dr. Price's Baking Powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Whip whites of eggs to firm, stiff froth; add cream of tartar; fold
sugar in lightly; fold in flour which has been sifted four times with
baking powder and salt; add vanilla. Pour into ungreased pan and bake
45 to 50 minutes in moderate oven. Remove from oven; invert pan and
allow to stand until cold. Ice with either chocolate or white icing
page 17.

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POUND CAKE

One pound of powdered white sugar.
One pound of fresh butter--washed.
Fourteen ounces of sifted flour.
Ten eggs.
One wine-glass of wine and brandy, mixed.
Half a glass of rose-water, or twelve drops of essence of lemon.
One tea-spoonful of mace and cinnamon, mixed.
One nutmeg, beaten or grated.
Pound the spice to a fine powder, in a marble mortar, and sift it
well.
Put the sugar into a deep earthen pan, and cut the butter into it.
Stir them together, till very light.
Beat the eggs in a broad shallow pan, till they are perfectly
smooth and thick.
Stir into the butter and sugar a little of the beaten egg, and
then a little flour, and so on alternately, a little egg and a
little flour, till the whole is in; continuing all the time to
beat the eggs, and stirring the mixture very hard. Add by degrees,
the spice, and then the liquor, a little at a time. Finally, put
in the rose-water, or essence of lemon. [Footnote: In buying
essence or oil of lemon, endeavour to get that which is white, it
being much the strongest and best. When it looks greenish, it is
generally very weak, so that when used, a double or treble
quantity is necessary.] Stir the whole very hard at the last.
Take about two dozen little tins, or more, if you have room for
them in the oven. Rub them very well with fresh butter. With a
spoon, put some of the mixture in each tin, but do not fill them
to the top as the cakes will rise high in baking. Bake them in a
quick oven, about a quarter of an hour. When they are done, they
will shrink a little from the sides of the tins.
Before you fill your tins again, scrape them well with a knife,
and wash or wipe them clean.
If the cakes are scorched by too hot a fire, do not scrape off the
burnt parts till they have grown cold.
Make an icing with the whites of three eggs, beaten till it stands
alone, and twenty-four tea-spoonfuls of the best loaf-sugar,
powdered, and beaten gradually into the white of egg. Flavour it
with a tea-spoonful of rose-water or eight drops of essence of
lemon, stirred in at the last. Spread it evenly with a broad
knife, over the top of each queen-cake, ornamenting them, (while
the icing is quite wet) with red and green nonpareils, or fine
sugar-sand, dropped on, carefully, with the thumb and finger.
When the cakes are iced, set them in a warm place to dry; but not
too near the fire, as that will cause the icing to crack.
[Footnote: You may colour icing of a fine pink, by mixing with it
a few drops of liquid cochineal; which is prepared by boiling very
slowly in an earthen or china vessel twenty grains of cochineal
powder, twenty grains of cream of tartar, and twenty grains of
powdered alum, all dissolved in a gill of soft water, and boiled
till reduced to one half. Strain it and cork it up in a small
phial. Pink icing should be ornamented with white nonpareils.]

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INDIAN POUND CAKE

A quarter of a pound of powdered sugar.
A quarter of a pound of fresh butter.
One pound of flour sifted.
One egg.
Three wine-glasses of milk.
A wine-glass and a half of the best yeast.
A table-spoonful of rose-water.
A tea-spoonful of powdered cinnamon.
Sift your flour into a pan. Cut up the butter in the milk, and
warm them a little, so as to soften the butter, but not to melt it
entirely. Beat your egg; pour the milk and butter into your pan of
flour, then the egg, then the rose-water and spice, and lastly the
yeast. Stir all well together with a knife.
Spread some flour on your paste-board: lay the dough on it, and
knead it well. Then divide it into small pieces of an equal size,
and knead each piece into a little thick round cake. Butter an
iron pan, lay the cakes in it, and set them in a warm place to
rise. Prick the tops with a fork. When they are quite light, bake
them in a moderate oven.

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Pound Cake

1 pound flour, 1 of sugar, 11 ounces butter, 10 eggs, 1/2 teaspoon soda.

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Sponge Pound Cake

1 heaping cup sugar, 1 scant cup butter, 6 eggs leaving out whites of 2

for icing, 1-1/2 cups flour, 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder. Flavoring.









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