The Marquis de Rambouillet, eldest brother of the Duchess of Montauzier, and the Marquis de Precy, eldest son of the family of Nantouillet, both of them between twenty and thirty, were intimate friends, and went to the wars, as in France d... Read more of The Marquis De Rambouillet at Scary Stories.caInformational Site Network Informational
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PRUNES

(Passover Dishes) - (The International Jewish Cook Book)







Wash the prunes well, first in warm water, then in cold. Cut up half a
lemon, some stick cinnamon and sugar to taste. Cook them in the oven,
covered tight, allowing a liberal quantity of water; stew slowly for two
hours; thicken with a teaspoon of potato flour, and wet the potato flour
with the juice of an orange before adding.
If the prunes are for chrimsel, leave out the thickening.

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CHESTNUTS AND PRUNES

Peel one pint of chestnuts and skin, then boil until tender. Boil one
pint of prunes till tender. Mix chestnuts and prunes together, leaving
whatever of sauce there is oil the prunes. Season with sugar, cinnamon,
and lemon juice, and cook all together.

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STEWED PRUNES

Cleanse thoroughly, soak in water ten or twelve hours, adding a little
granulated sugar when putting to soak, for although the fruit is sweet
enough, yet experience has shown that the added sugar changes by
chemical process into fruit sugar and brings out better the flavor of
the fruit. After soaking, the fruit will assume its full size, and is
ready to be simmered on the back of the stove. Do not boil prunes, that
is what spoils them. Simmer, simmer only. Keep lid on. Shake gently, do
not stir, and never let boil. When tender they are ready for table.
Serve cold, and a little cream will make them more delicious. A little
claret or sauterne poured over the prunes just as cooking is finished
adds a flavor relished by many. Added just before simmering, a little
sliced lemon or orange gives a rich color and flavor to the syrup.

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BAKED PRUNES

Cook prunes in an earthenware bean pot in the oven. Wash and soak the
prunes and put them in the pot with a very little water; let them cook
slowly for a long time. They will be found delicious, thick and rich,
without any of the objectionable sweetness. Lemon, juice and peel, may
be added if desired.

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PRUNES WITHOUT SUGAR

Wash prunes thoroughly, pour boiling water over same and let them stand
for ten minutes. Then drain and pour boiling water over them again; put
in sealed jar; see that prunes are all covered with water. Ready for use
after forty-eight hours. Will keep for a week at a time and the longer
they stand the thicker the syrup gets.

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STEAMED PRUNES

Steam until the fruit is swollen to its original size and is tender.
Sprinkle with powdered sugar and squeeze lemon juice over them.

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SCALLOPED NOODLES AND PRUNES

Make broad noodles with three eggs. Boil until tender, drain, pouring
cold water through colander. Stew prunes, sprinkle with sugar and
cinnamon. In a well-greased baking-dish place one-quarter of the
noodles, bits of butter or other fat, add one-half of the prunes, then
another layer of the noodles, butter or fat, the remaining prunes, the
rest of the noodles. Pour over the prune juice and spread crumbs over
top and bake in a moderate oven until crumbs are brown.

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STUFFED PRUNES

Take one pound of best prunes, stone and soak in sherry for about an
hour (do not cover with the wine). Fill prunes with one large browned
almond and one-half marshmallow or with another prune, roll in
granulated sugar, and when all are finished, put in oven for two or
three minutes.

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FRENCH PRUNES IN COGNAC

Lay the prunes in white wine for two days; then put on a wire sieve to
drip, but do not squeeze them. When they look dry, which will be in
about half an hour, lay in glass jars with alternate layers of sugar and
stick cinnamon and a few pieces of mace and a very few cloves. When the
jars are full, fill up with cognac and seal. Set in the sunniest place
you can find for three days.

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PRESERVED "GERMAN PRUNES" OR PLUMS

After washing fruit, piece each plum several times with a silver fork,
if plums be preserved whole. This is not necessary if pits are
removed. Weigh fruit and to each pound of plums take about 3/4 pound
of granulated sugar. Place alternate layers of plums and sugar in a
preserving kettle, stand on the back of range three or four hours,
until sugar has dissolved, then draw kettle containing sugar and plums
to front of range and boil so minutes. Remove scum which arises on top
of boiling syrup. Place plums in glass jars, pour boiling syrup over
and seal.
A good rule is about four pounds of sugar to five pounds of plums.
Should plums cook soft in less than 20 minutes, take from syrup with a
perforated skimmer, place in jars and cook syrup until as thick as
honey; then pour over fruit and seal up jars.

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STUFFED PRUNES OR DATES

Blanch almonds by putting into boiling water for a few minutes. Remove
skins, dry well and brown in heated oil or butter on top of stove or
in oven. Take from fire when very light brown, as they continue to
color after removing from fire. Drain well on brown paper and sprinkle
with salt.









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